We’re not ones for the summer television hiatus—but forgive us when we say that we wish the season finale of Parks and Recreation would get here now. It’s already been revealed that Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy will appear on the show. Now Yo La Tengo, The Decemberists, Letters to Cleo and Ginuwine has all been added to the list of guest stars. (via Yo La Tengo, The Decemberists, Jeff Tweedy And More To Appear on Parks and Recreation | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

We’re not ones for the summer television hiatus—but forgive us when we say that we wish the season finale of Parks and Recreation would get here now. It’s already been revealed that Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy will appear on the show. Now Yo La Tengo, The Decemberists, Letters to Cleo and Ginuwine has all been added to the list of guest stars. (via Yo La Tengo, The Decemberists, Jeff Tweedy And More To Appear on Parks and Recreation | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Next week The Decemeberists' Colin Meloy will set off on a new solo tour, bringing with him the latest installment of his Colin Meloy Sings… cover EPs.

Next week The Decemeberists' Colin Meloy will set off on a new solo tour, bringing with him the latest installment of his Colin Meloy Sings… cover EPs.

Decemeberists’ frontman Colin Meloy has announced plans for a new solo tour, his first in five years.

Decemeberists’ frontman Colin Meloy has announced plans for a new solo tour, his first in five years.

Classic Interview: 
Though it’s reputed to be the most widely spoken musical language in the world today, rock and roll was born on the margins. The offspring of marginalized bluesmen, backwoods country singers, broke ass jazz bands, and rowdy kids who dared to mix black R&B with white pop music, it was once the musical representation of everything that was thought to be dangerously lurking beneath the veneer of American society. But, once its baby teeth fell out, it became a business, neutered for the masses with subsequent waves of reformations aimed at bringing the music back to its liberated roots. Arguably the most enduring of these, indie rock—itself the successor of the punk rock, New Wave, hardcore, and college radio scenes of the ’70s and ’80s—proudly carried the outsider banner, defining itself in opposition to the music that was designed to appeal to the masses, the antidote for everyone who wasn’t content to take what was fed to them on the radio and MTV. But by the middle of the first decade of the new century, indie was in, with Feist turning up in commercials, Sonic Youth playing on popular primetime TV shows, and stadiums full of sports fans chanting the hook to The White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army.” Suddenly, indie rock had expanded its territory; it just wasn’t clear who its residents were anymore. (via A Decade of Indie: The Rise of the Outsiders | Under The Radar)

Classic Interview: 

Though it’s reputed to be the most widely spoken musical language in the world today, rock and roll was born on the margins. The offspring of marginalized bluesmen, backwoods country singers, broke ass jazz bands, and rowdy kids who dared to mix black R&B with white pop music, it was once the musical representation of everything that was thought to be dangerously lurking beneath the veneer of American society. But, once its baby teeth fell out, it became a business, neutered for the masses with subsequent waves of reformations aimed at bringing the music back to its liberated roots. Arguably the most enduring of these, indie rock—itself the successor of the punk rock, New Wave, hardcore, and college radio scenes of the ’70s and ’80s—proudly carried the outsider banner, defining itself in opposition to the music that was designed to appeal to the masses, the antidote for everyone who wasn’t content to take what was fed to them on the radio and MTV. But by the middle of the first decade of the new century, indie was in, with Feist turning up in commercials, Sonic Youth playing on popular primetime TV shows, and stadiums full of sports fans chanting the hook to The White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army.” Suddenly, indie rock had expanded its territory; it just wasn’t clear who its residents were anymore. (via A Decade of Indie: The Rise of the Outsiders | Under The Radar)

Last night on The Simpsons the town of Springfield was invaded by a whole mess of special guests.

Last night on The Simpsons the town of Springfield was invaded by a whole mess of special guests.

Looking back: Under the Radar’s fifteenth issue. 
Featuring: The Aliens • I’m From Barcelona • Peter Bjorn and John • Midlake • Viva Voce • Darkel • Kasabian • The Divine Comedy • Joanna Newsom • The Cardigans • Sparklehorse • Yo La Tengo • The Decemberists, Love Is All vs. The Vaselines • The Dresden Dolls vs. Bauhaus 

Looking back: Under the Radar’s fifteenth issue

Featuring: The Aliens • I’m From Barcelona • Peter Bjorn and John • Midlake • Viva Voce • Darkel • Kasabian • The Divine Comedy • Joanna Newsom • The Cardigans • Sparklehorse • Yo La Tengo • The Decemberists, Love Is All vs. The Vaselines • The Dresden Dolls vs. Bauhaus 

Joining the ranks of George Harrison, The Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers, The White Stripes, U2, and a select number of yellow-ized musical artists, The Decemberists have revealed that they will guest as themselves during the new fall season of The Simpsons.

Joining the ranks of George Harrison, The Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers, The White Stripes, U2, and a select number of yellow-ized musical artists, The Decemberists have revealed that they will guest as themselves during the new fall season of The Simpsons.

What is “indie?” a classic article: 
Though it’s reputed to be the most widely spoken musical language in the world today, rock and roll was born on the margins. The offspring of marginalized bluesmen, backwoods country singers, broke ass jazz bands, and rowdy kids who dared to mix black R&B with white pop music, it was once the musical representation of everything that was thought to be dangerously lurking beneath the veneer of American society. But, once its baby teeth fell out, it became a business, neutered for the masses with subsequent waves of reformations aimed at bringing the music back to its liberated roots. Arguably the most enduring of these, indie rock—itself the successor of the punk rock, New Wave, hardcore, and college radio scenes of the ’70s and ’80s—proudly carried the outsider banner, defining itself in opposition to the music that was designed to appeal to the masses, the antidote for everyone who wasn’t content to take what was fed to them on the radio and MTV. But by the middle of the first decade of the new century, indie was in, with Feist turning up in commercials, Sonic Youth playing on popular primetime TV shows, and stadiums full of sports fans chanting the hook to The White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army.” Suddenly, indie rock had expanded its territory; it just wasn’t clear who its residents were anymore. (via A Decade of Indie: The Rise of the Outsiders | Under The Radar)

What is “indie?” a classic article: 

Though it’s reputed to be the most widely spoken musical language in the world today, rock and roll was born on the margins. The offspring of marginalized bluesmen, backwoods country singers, broke ass jazz bands, and rowdy kids who dared to mix black R&B with white pop music, it was once the musical representation of everything that was thought to be dangerously lurking beneath the veneer of American society. But, once its baby teeth fell out, it became a business, neutered for the masses with subsequent waves of reformations aimed at bringing the music back to its liberated roots. Arguably the most enduring of these, indie rock—itself the successor of the punk rock, New Wave, hardcore, and college radio scenes of the ’70s and ’80s—proudly carried the outsider banner, defining itself in opposition to the music that was designed to appeal to the masses, the antidote for everyone who wasn’t content to take what was fed to them on the radio and MTV. But by the middle of the first decade of the new century, indie was in, with Feist turning up in commercials, Sonic Youth playing on popular primetime TV shows, and stadiums full of sports fans chanting the hook to The White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army.” Suddenly, indie rock had expanded its territory; it just wasn’t clear who its residents were anymore. (via A Decade of Indie: The Rise of the Outsiders | Under The Radar)

As previously announced, Decemberists frontman Colin Meloy has been using his downtime from the wordy Pacific Northwest band to put a few words down on paper. (via Get a Preview of the Second Young Adult Novel By Colin Meloy | Under The Radar)

As previously announced, Decemberists frontman Colin Meloy has been using his downtime from the wordy Pacific Northwest band to put a few words down on paper. (via Get a Preview of the Second Young Adult Novel By Colin Meloy | Under The Radar)