Zach Braff has just confirmed some of the details of his forthcoming film Wish I was Here (his directorial follow-up to Garden State). The soundtrack alone might give you a flashback to when Scrubs was big, indie was cool, all anyone ever wanted was for Natalie Portman to come along and change your life with a Shins song. (via The Shins, Bon Iver, Cat Power, and Coldplay Appear on Zach Braff’s “Wish I was Here” Soundtrack | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Zach Braff has just confirmed some of the details of his forthcoming film Wish I was Here (his directorial follow-up to Garden State). The soundtrack alone might give you a flashback to when Scrubs was big, indie was cool, all anyone ever wanted was for Natalie Portman to come along and change your life with a Shins song. (via The Shins, Bon Iver, Cat Power, and Coldplay Appear on Zach Braff’s “Wish I was Here” Soundtrack | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Willis Earl Beal wants you to know that he considers himself a fortunate man, or, in his words, “more fortunate than unfortunate.” But from the outset of our hour-long interview, it’s clear that Beal is growing weary of his life as a musician. Pushing out his words with a tangible sense of frustration, he speaks like someone who has thought through every word that comes out of his mouth, as if he’s been walking around repeating an internal dialog and just waiting for an opportunity to vent. Still, one gets the sense that Beal is nothing but sincere when he admits that things could be worse. After all, he has a critically-acclaimed new album, Nobody Knows, a startling leap forward from his engrossingly primitive 2012 debut, Acousmatic Sorcery. He also took a starring turn in Tim Sutton’s Memphis, playing—what else—a conflicted musician, adding yet another unexpected chapter to a life that has been marked by struggle and success in nearly equal measure. Today, however, Beal is mostly interested in talking about the former and not so much the latter. [Note: These are extra portions of our interview with Willis Earl Beal, quotes that didn’t make it into our main print article on him.] (via Willis Earl Beal: The Trouble I’ve Seen | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Willis Earl Beal wants you to know that he considers himself a fortunate man, or, in his words, “more fortunate than unfortunate.” But from the outset of our hour-long interview, it’s clear that Beal is growing weary of his life as a musician. Pushing out his words with a tangible sense of frustration, he speaks like someone who has thought through every word that comes out of his mouth, as if he’s been walking around repeating an internal dialog and just waiting for an opportunity to vent. Still, one gets the sense that Beal is nothing but sincere when he admits that things could be worse. After all, he has a critically-acclaimed new album, Nobody Knows, a startling leap forward from his engrossingly primitive 2012 debut, Acousmatic Sorcery. He also took a starring turn in Tim Sutton’s Memphis, playing—what else—a conflicted musician, adding yet another unexpected chapter to a life that has been marked by struggle and success in nearly equal measure. Today, however, Beal is mostly interested in talking about the former and not so much the latter. [Note: These are extra portions of our interview with Willis Earl Beal, quotes that didn’t make it into our main print article on him.] (via Willis Earl Beal: The Trouble I’ve Seen | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Willis Earl Beal wants you to know that he considers himself a fortunate man, or, in his words, “more fortunate than unfortunate.” But from the outset of our hour-long interview, it’s clear that Beal is growing weary of his life as a musician. Pushing out his words with a tangible sense of frustration, he speaks like someone who has thought through every word that comes out of his mouth, as if he’s been walking around repeating an internal dialog and just waiting for an opportunity to vent. Still, one gets the sense that Beal is nothing but sincere when he admits that things could be worse. After all, he has a critically-acclaimed new album, Nobody Knows, a startling leap forward from his engrossingly primitive 2012 debut, Acousmatic Sorcery. He also took a starring turn in Tim Sutton’s Memphis, playing—what else—a conflicted musician, adding yet another unexpected chapter to a life that has been marked by struggle and success in nearly equal measure. Today, however, Beal is mostly interested in talking about the former and not so much the latter. [Note: These are extra portions of our interview with Willis Earl Beal, quotes that didn’t make it into our main print article on him.] (via Willis Earl Beal: The Trouble I’ve Seen - Bonus Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Willis Earl Beal wants you to know that he considers himself a fortunate man, or, in his words, “more fortunate than unfortunate.” But from the outset of our hour-long interview, it’s clear that Beal is growing weary of his life as a musician. Pushing out his words with a tangible sense of frustration, he speaks like someone who has thought through every word that comes out of his mouth, as if he’s been walking around repeating an internal dialog and just waiting for an opportunity to vent. Still, one gets the sense that Beal is nothing but sincere when he admits that things could be worse. After all, he has a critically-acclaimed new album, Nobody Knows, a startling leap forward from his engrossingly primitive 2012 debut, Acousmatic Sorcery. He also took a starring turn in Tim Sutton’s Memphis, playing—what else—a conflicted musician, adding yet another unexpected chapter to a life that has been marked by struggle and success in nearly equal measure. Today, however, Beal is mostly interested in talking about the former and not so much the latter. [Note: These are extra portions of our interview with Willis Earl Beal, quotes that didn’t make it into our main print article on him.] (via Willis Earl Beal: The Trouble I’ve Seen - Bonus Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Willis Earl Beal never wanted to be famous—he wants to make that point clear. And that’s an inconvenient reality for the 29-year-old Chicago transplant, who now finds himself with a critically-acclaimed sophomore album that he doesn’t really want to talk about, a hotly-anticipated schedule of concert dates that he doesn’t really want to play, and a music career that he’d really rather not have. Unfortunately for him, his new album, the darkly haunted, deeply soulful Nobody Knows, is the kind of release that’s likely to only expand his fame exponentially. (via Willis Earl Beal: Deal with the Devil - Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Willis Earl Beal never wanted to be famous—he wants to make that point clear. And that’s an inconvenient reality for the 29-year-old Chicago transplant, who now finds himself with a critically-acclaimed sophomore album that he doesn’t really want to talk about, a hotly-anticipated schedule of concert dates that he doesn’t really want to play, and a music career that he’d really rather not have. Unfortunately for him, his new album, the darkly haunted, deeply soulful Nobody Knows, is the kind of release that’s likely to only expand his fame exponentially. (via Willis Earl Beal: Deal with the Devil - Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

While the days of watching music videos on television are long gone, over the past several years the visual art form has certainly found second life (like so many other things) as an excellent online commodity. In 2013 many music videos went beyond just being a cool visual acccompaniment of a favorite song to become standout pieces in their own right. Whether they were cinematically compelling, told a great story, were creatively off-beat and did something different, or were just incredibly entertaining, the here are Under the Radar’s favorites from a fantastic year. (via Under the Radar’s Top 50 Music Videos of 2013 | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

While the days of watching music videos on television are long gone, over the past several years the visual art form has certainly found second life (like so many other things) as an excellent online commodity. In 2013 many music videos went beyond just being a cool visual acccompaniment of a favorite song to become standout pieces in their own right. Whether they were cinematically compelling, told a great story, were creatively off-beat and did something different, or were just incredibly entertaining, the here are Under the Radar’s favorites from a fantastic year. (via Under the Radar’s Top 50 Music Videos of 2013 | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Apple has always had a great track record when it comes to utilizing music in their advertisements, regularly boosting a song’s popularity in the process.

Apple has always had a great track record when it comes to utilizing music in their advertisements, regularly boosting a song’s popularity in the process.

Singer/songwriter Chan Marshall, a.k.a. Cat Power, has announced plans for a month-long tour across the U.S. this fall.

Singer/songwriter Chan Marshall, a.k.a. Cat Power, has announced plans for a month-long tour across the U.S. this fall.

What inspires Nervous Nellie’s blend of jittery electro hooks and pure pop? Cat Power, Björk, Daniel Johnston, Beach House, for starters. In honor of the Swedish band’s first U.S. tour (head to the bottom of the page for dates), we asked them to contribute to our ongoing mixtape project. (via Premiere: Nervous Nellie Mixtape | Under The Radar)

What inspires Nervous Nellie’s blend of jittery electro hooks and pure pop? Cat Power, Björk, Daniel Johnston, Beach House, for starters. In honor of the Swedish band’s first U.S. tour (head to the bottom of the page for dates), we asked them to contribute to our ongoing mixtape project. (via Premiere: Nervous Nellie Mixtape | Under The Radar)

Soon to release his newest albumNobody Knows on Sept. 10, Chicago musical artistWillis Earl Beal has shared a brand new track from the effort titled “Coming Through.”

Soon to release his newest albumNobody Knows on Sept. 10, Chicago musical artistWillis Earl Beal has shared a brand new track from the effort titled “Coming Through.”

Sheets of rain greeted festival attendees on day three of Way Out West. Over drinks, festival co-founder Joel Borg joked that their goal is to be one of the prettiest festivals in the rain. Judging by the surprising lack of mud puddles at the end of the deluge, he may be able to hang that mission-accomplished banner now. Not being much of an R&B/Hip-Hop fan (Kendrick Lamar, Public Enemy, and Danny Brown were among the day’s offerings), I spent the moist day three taking in Cat Power, James Blake, and INGRID. (via Way Out West Festival 2013 Day Three: Cat Power, James Blake, and More | Under The Radar)

Sheets of rain greeted festival attendees on day three of Way Out West. Over drinks, festival co-founder Joel Borg joked that their goal is to be one of the prettiest festivals in the rain. Judging by the surprising lack of mud puddles at the end of the deluge, he may be able to hang that mission-accomplished banner now. Not being much of an R&B/Hip-Hop fan (Kendrick Lamar, Public Enemy, and Danny Brown were among the day’s offerings), I spent the moist day three taking in Cat Power, James Blake, and INGRID. (via Way Out West Festival 2013 Day Three: Cat Power, James Blake, and More | Under The Radar)