Still adhering to their own standard of weird, MGMT stopped by the set of Conan last night as the evening’s musical guest.

Still adhering to their own standard of weird, MGMT stopped by the set of Conan last night as the evening’s musical guest.

"This is our decision/To live fast and die young/We’ve got the vision/Now let’s have some fun." Those words, taken from MGMT’s 2008 breakout single "Time to Pretend," have become a rallying cry of sorts, a party-‘til-you-die anthem for people who want to dream big and party defiantly. Written by multi-instrumentalists Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser while they were seniors at Wesleyan College in the early 2000s, the song appears on the surface to be poking fun at a checklist of rock star clichés—the girls, the drugs, the money—and the realization that such a life of excess was only a fantasy, that they were "fated to pretend" that it could ever be theirs. Read deeper, though, and perhaps the song isn’t about rock star wannabes and their unattainable daydreams as much as it is about two college kids making fun of people who would want such a life in the first place, a satirical swipe at those who want to live (and die) a cliché. Maybe the song isn’t serious at all. Maybe the song is a joke. (via MGMT - Read the Under the Radar Cover Story Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

"This is our decision/To live fast and die young/We’ve got the vision/Now let’s have some fun." Those words, taken from MGMT’s 2008 breakout single "Time to Pretend," have become a rallying cry of sorts, a party-‘til-you-die anthem for people who want to dream big and party defiantly. Written by multi-instrumentalists Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser while they were seniors at Wesleyan College in the early 2000s, the song appears on the surface to be poking fun at a checklist of rock star clichés—the girls, the drugs, the money—and the realization that such a life of excess was only a fantasy, that they were "fated to pretend" that it could ever be theirs. Read deeper, though, and perhaps the song isn’t about rock star wannabes and their unattainable daydreams as much as it is about two college kids making fun of people who would want such a life in the first place, a satirical swipe at those who want to live (and die) a cliché. Maybe the song isn’t serious at all. Maybe the song is a joke. (via MGMT - Read the Under the Radar Cover Story Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

In the fall of 2010, an article came out in the U.K. announcing that MGMT’s creative license had expired. Columbia Records, it was reported, was frustrated by the artistic extravagances and resulting commercial struggles the band had encountered after releasing their Congratulations album, and had decided that songwriters and multi-instrumentalists Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser needed some oversight from the folks footing the bill for all of the band’s fun. Though it turns out that VanWyngarden was apparently misquoted—something that is hardly out of the realm of possibility for someone who laces his conversations with more than a few half-serious asides—the reason the rumor stuck was obvious: even if it wasn’t true, it fit the growing narrative of a band that didn’t know when to rein in their own ideas. Whatever, if Columbia was bent on forcing MGMT to produce another album of synthpop smashes and psychedelia-tinged anthems, their third full-length release is certainly not that record. In fact, MGMT sounds like the album people thought Congratulations was—an unflinchingly experimental, uncompromisingly strange, and boldly idiosyncratic release that has little chance of putting any singles on Top 40 radio. Here, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden talk about their creative process, the newfound existential bent in the songwriting, and why they aren’t a psychedelic band. [Note: These are extra portions of our interview with MGMT, quotes that didn’t make it into our main print article on the band.] (via MGMT Bonus Interview: Rumors and Lies | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

In the fall of 2010, an article came out in the U.K. announcing that MGMT’s creative license had expired. Columbia Records, it was reported, was frustrated by the artistic extravagances and resulting commercial struggles the band had encountered after releasing their Congratulations album, and had decided that songwriters and multi-instrumentalists Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser needed some oversight from the folks footing the bill for all of the band’s fun. Though it turns out that VanWyngarden was apparently misquoted—something that is hardly out of the realm of possibility for someone who laces his conversations with more than a few half-serious asides—the reason the rumor stuck was obvious: even if it wasn’t true, it fit the growing narrative of a band that didn’t know when to rein in their own ideas. Whatever, if Columbia was bent on forcing MGMT to produce another album of synthpop smashes and psychedelia-tinged anthems, their third full-length release is certainly not that record. In fact, MGMT sounds like the album people thought Congratulations was—an unflinchingly experimental, uncompromisingly strange, and boldly idiosyncratic release that has little chance of putting any singles on Top 40 radio. Here, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden talk about their creative process, the newfound existential bent in the songwriting, and why they aren’t a psychedelic band. [Note: These are extra portions of our interview with MGMT, quotes that didn’t make it into our main print article on the band.] (via MGMT Bonus Interview: Rumors and Lies | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

"This is our decision/To live fast and die young/We’ve got the vision/Now let’s have some fun." Those words, taken from MGMT’s 2008 breakout single "Time to Pretend," have become a rallying cry of sorts, a party-‘til-you-die anthem for people who want to dream big and party defiantly. Written by multi-instrumentalists Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser while they were seniors at Wesleyan College in the early 2000s, the song appears on the surface to be poking fun at a checklist of rock star clichés—the girls, the drugs, the money—and the realization that such a life of excess was only a fantasy, that they were "fated to pretend" that it could ever be theirs. Read deeper, though, and perhaps the song isn’t about rock star wannabes and their unattainable daydreams as much as it is about two college kids making fun of people who would want such a life in the first place, a satirical swipe at those who want to live (and die) a cliché. Maybe the song isn’t serious at all. Maybe the song is a joke. (via MGMT: Fated to Confuse - Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

"This is our decision/To live fast and die young/We’ve got the vision/Now let’s have some fun." Those words, taken from MGMT’s 2008 breakout single "Time to Pretend," have become a rallying cry of sorts, a party-‘til-you-die anthem for people who want to dream big and party defiantly. Written by multi-instrumentalists Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser while they were seniors at Wesleyan College in the early 2000s, the song appears on the surface to be poking fun at a checklist of rock star clichés—the girls, the drugs, the money—and the realization that such a life of excess was only a fantasy, that they were "fated to pretend" that it could ever be theirs. Read deeper, though, and perhaps the song isn’t about rock star wannabes and their unattainable daydreams as much as it is about two college kids making fun of people who would want such a life in the first place, a satirical swipe at those who want to live (and die) a cliché. Maybe the song isn’t serious at all. Maybe the song is a joke. (via MGMT: Fated to Confuse - Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Our cover artists MGMT are keepin’ it weird in the video for “Alien Days,” A cut from their recently released self-titled album. (via Watch: MGMT – “Your Life Is A Lie” Video | Under the Radar - Indie Music Magazine)

Our cover artists MGMT are keepin’ it weird in the video for “Alien Days,” A cut from their recently released self-titled album. (via Watch: MGMT – “Your Life Is A Lie” Video | Under the Radar - Indie Music Magazine)

Last night Under the Radar cover stars MGMT brought the deliberate weirdness of their new self-titled album to the late night set of England’s Later…with Jools Holland. 

Last night Under the Radar cover stars MGMT brought the deliberate weirdness of their new self-titled album to the late night set of England’s Later…with Jools Holland