Slow Club’s Charles Watson tells a story about the British band’s 2009 American tour with Norwegian synthpop band Casiokids, explaining how he and co-leader Rebecca Taylor would stand at the side of the stage and marvel at how the audience would dance in unison during their tourmates’ set, as if surrendering themselves to the music. Slow Club’s brand of ethereal, often-austere indie pop had earned critical plaudits and loyal listeners, but it didn’t have this kind of power to move people physically. It wasn’t until a few years later, while the band was touring 2011 sophomore album, Paradise, that Watson and Taylor saw a comparable reaction to one of their own compositions, a work-in-progress track entitled “Not Mine to Love.” A soulful torch song with a massive sing-along chorus, it would end up becoming the seed of Slow Club’s third full-length release, Complete Surrender. 

 (via Slow Club on the Less-Is-More Philosophy of “Complete Surrender” Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

Slow Club’s Charles Watson tells a story about the British band’s 2009 American tour with Norwegian synthpop band Casiokids, explaining how he and co-leader Rebecca Taylor would stand at the side of the stage and marvel at how the audience would dance in unison during their tourmates’ set, as if surrendering themselves to the music. Slow Club’s brand of ethereal, often-austere indie pop had earned critical plaudits and loyal listeners, but it didn’t have this kind of power to move people physically. It wasn’t until a few years later, while the band was touring 2011 sophomore album, Paradise, that Watson and Taylor saw a comparable reaction to one of their own compositions, a work-in-progress track entitled “Not Mine to Love.” A soulful torch song with a massive sing-along chorus, it would end up becoming the seed of Slow Club’s third full-length release, Complete Surrender.

(via Slow Club on the Less-Is-More Philosophy of “Complete Surrender” Interview | Under the Radar - Music Magazine)

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