Most films about social movements and/or young revolutionaries are serious affairs, the main goal of which is to accurately depict the gravity of the situation in a “realistic” manner. Unless you’re a musical (think Hair or Rent) or a quirky Hollywood exercise (Forrest Gump is a prime example), this tactic is probably the most readily available to a director, and also conveniently accessible to an audience. In order for a spectator to engage with the protagonist in said environment, there needs to be a proper background drawn of the situation’s dire straits. As such, these films function like any other genre flick with interchangeable parts; oppressed he/she is tired of being forced to do X/Y and therefore decides to take action in their own/a group’s hands to change the situation. Depicting the Chilean dictatorship and regime of Augusto Pinochet is prime fodder for this genre, especially for non-Chilean audiences whose memory of the horrific events that transpired is probably slight at best. Pablo Larrain’s fantastic new film No depicts a very specific part of the aforementioned time period, but does so in a spectacularly self-reflexive way, making it a delightful entry into a genre that needs a bit of shaking up. (via No | Under The Radar)

Most films about social movements and/or young revolutionaries are serious affairs, the main goal of which is to accurately depict the gravity of the situation in a “realistic” manner. Unless you’re a musical (think Hair or Rent) or a quirky Hollywood exercise (Forrest Gump is a prime example), this tactic is probably the most readily available to a director, and also conveniently accessible to an audience. In order for a spectator to engage with the protagonist in said environment, there needs to be a proper background drawn of the situation’s dire straits. As such, these films function like any other genre flick with interchangeable parts; oppressed he/she is tired of being forced to do X/Y and therefore decides to take action in their own/a group’s hands to change the situation. Depicting the Chilean dictatorship and regime of Augusto Pinochet is prime fodder for this genre, especially for non-Chilean audiences whose memory of the horrific events that transpired is probably slight at best. Pablo Larrain’s fantastic new film No depicts a very specific part of the aforementioned time period, but does so in a spectacularly self-reflexive way, making it a delightful entry into a genre that needs a bit of shaking up. (via No | Under The Radar)

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